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warned about acts of terror. >>> major u.s. media report that boeing has developed possible fixes for the battery problems of its dreamliner aircraft. if the fixes work, 787 airliners could be back in the air as early as april. the new boeing 787 fleet was grounded in january after a series of problems occurred with their lithium ion batteries. the "new york times" and the "wall street journal" report that boeing officials plan to propose the fixes to the federal aviation administration as early as friday. the u.s. newspapers say that boeing plans to redesign the arrangement of eight lithium ion batteries -- that's lithium ion cells in each battery -- and add insulation in between them. boeing told the media that the changes could minimize the risk of a short circuit or fire in one of the cells spreading to others. the plane manufacturer also told the media that it plans to put the batteries in new protective cases so that the failure of single cells will not cause fires. the two u.s. newspapers said the faa would not approve the proposed changes immediately. they report that fede
this month. they will go over something that's been a thorn in japan-u. relatis. threlocation of a u.s. military base. both governments want the plan to go ahead but the people in japan south aren't on board. >> reporter: they talk about relocating the station. >> translar: we must remove as possible, in accordance with an agreement with the u.s. government. >> translator: we want the base to be moved out of okinawa. >> reporter: okinawa is japan's southernmost prefecture. the island district comprises only 0.6% of japan's land but hosts 70% of the u.s. bases in the nation. for many, futenma symbolizes okinawans unfair burden in ensuring japan's security. this is the futenma air station. you see aircrafts, runway and if you turn this way, you can see how close the residential area of okinawa is to the space. in 1996, the u.s. agreed to return the futenma site to japan. masahide ota was okinawa's governor then. >> i was so happy, and -- but after one year or so, i was told that the, even though they would return the futenma marine corps air base, they need to leave an occasional site to
officials are trying to find out who made the decision to lock on. now, the u.s. state department spokesperson expressed her concern over the incident. >> actions such as this escalate tensions and increase the risk of an incident or a miscalculation, and they could undermine peace, stability, and economic growth in this vital region. so we are concerned about it. >> u.s. officials have been increasingly uneasy about rising tensions in the area. >>> military analysts are trying to figure out what the chinese are trying to do. bonji ohara is a former navy captain with japan's self-defense forces. he says the chinese sent a clear message. >> it is a serious thing. if the radar is the fire-control radar, can control the weapon, usually a battlhipas that kind of radar, one is searching radar, for navigation. one is for the targeting, control weapon radar. this is the fc radar. this time chinese side used this fc radar. it means they showed to the ship they have the intention to attack the japanese ship. so it is very serious and danger. i think the -- there are two ssib scenarios one
. >> reporter: despite solid earnings at the end of last year, there are fresh worries about the state of the u.s. economy and profits for this year. on top of that, financial conditions in the eurozone are still a threat to u.s. stocks. >> with the market at current levels, which... basically looks like they're priced for perfection, there doesn't leave a lot of room for any disappointing news. and there are a lot of areas that could create disappointing news. >> reporter: weissberg says many market pros believe stocks are headed higher, but they need a catalyst, and that's unlikely to come from tonight's state of the union. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, why ailing smartphone maker blackberry is hoping the sports market will help it on its road to recovery. we'll explain in tonight's "beyond the scoreboard." a "silly sideshow--" that's what apple c.e.o. tim cook called a recent lawsuit filed by hedge fund manager david einhorn. speaking at a goldman sachs technology conference today, cook also said apple is considering einhorn's proposal to issue preferred stock and r
over one day. another factor is there are rebels jihaddists, al-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't rul
's ceremony unveiling a statue of civil rights pioneer rosa parks in the u.s. capitol. >> she lived a life of activism but also a life of dignity and grace. and in a single moment with the simplest of gestures she helped change america and change the world. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the nine justices of the u.s. supreme court pondered a central piece of civil rights legislation today. at issue: whether it's still needed, 48 years after it first became law. >> we are not there yet! >> brown: georgia congressman and civil rights leader john lewis was one of many who rallied outside the court this morning for the voting rights act. they were there on a day the justices heard a challenge to a key section of the law: it requires states with a hist
sharply lower after a strong rally on monday. the drop follows a slump in u.s. markets. the yen strength has been a drag on a wide range of issues. they are concerned about whether italy can consider its final reforms. the nikkei average is down 1.75%. the dollar was at a one month low and not a one month high. let's take a look at other markets in the asia pacific. south korea's kospi down a thirthird of a percent. let's see what's going in australia. it's down to 5,018. we'll see where other markets take us as they open in next hour. japan's prime minister abe has made his choice for the new bank of japan leader. looks like many leaders of the oppotion party of japan wi goalong with it. kuroda is the chief of the asian development bank. abe is planning to present his nominees to the diet for approval by the end of this week. the government needs support from opposition parties. some members have expressed concerns. they say signing off on his appointment could be construed as approving the there isn't much doubt about his ability. some say there's not much mileage in continuing its opp
to stand on their own by 2014 when u.s. troops are scheduled to withdraw. and great power politics are on the a lend-- agenda again. china is confident, insertive in the south china sea in relations about moskow have cooled. all of this with a troubled economy at home and calls for a lighter footprint abroad. i'm pleased to have tom donilon back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: we are now into a second term. what do we mean by lighter footprint? >> well, if we step back on that, at the beginning of 2012, the president after a multimonth review, close consultation with the uniformed military, the joint chief, service secretaries and combatant commanders around the world put together a new defense strategy. that defense strategy had to take into account that the budget control act required the defense budget over ot next ten years to be reduced by $500 million or so, a little less than that. and which would require a 5% decrease over what were the plans. and in doing that the president asked the military to think about what the new challenges were going to be.
life in prison. in economic news, output at u.s. auto plants fell in january, and that pushed overall manufacturing down after two months of gains. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average gained eight points to close at 13,981. the nasdaq fell six points to close at 3,192. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq dropped a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: president obama wrapped up his post-state of the union tour with a visit to his hometown today. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the president's trip to chicago came amid the country's new focus on gun violence. and while he was there to talk about raising the minimum wage and expanding preschool for children, the city's surge of gun killings wasn't far from his mind. >> last year, there were 443 murders with a firearm on the streets of this city, and 65 of those victims were 18 and under. so that's the equivalent of a newtown everfour months. and that's precisely why the overwhelming majority of americans are asking for some common-sense propo
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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